You’ll find them in every corner of the world! How do they fare against the upstart Fever Tree? Startled from its decades-long slumber, the leviathan Schweppes has cooked up a new range of premium tonics, called 1783. It’s enough to give you a headache just thinking about it. That ganky catch at the back of your throat, that pissy, chemical bitterness. They have a bunch of flavours including cucumber tonic, floral tonic, salty lemon tonic and suchlike. It’s lean and clean and modest — as it bloody should be — and it steps back from the limelight. Jesus Howling Christ, I cannot stand artificial sweeteners. So overall I think they’ve improved the current tonic proposition leaps and bounds; but perhaps slightly to heavy on the gassy score! And really rather nice. Fever Tree Naturally Light is far more forgiving, simply because it’s less goddamn sweet. Was nice as tonic water, considering tonic water can be bit bitter. Yes, Stevo, 1724 is a tad too sweet for me — but you’re right: at least it’s not artificial! If only it were less sweet. So, today — as the rather prosaic title might imply — we’re comparing Fever Tree’s tonic water (both Naturally Light and Regular versions) against Schweppes’ fancy-pants newish 1783 sub-brand (again, Light and Regular variants). Which is fine if that’s what you want — you misguided imbecile — but not really what I’m after, tbh. a must have with any Gin! You’re not an idiot, are you, though? My opinion is that they have the marketing & design bang on; but what about the taste? The gin is where the interesting stuff comes from, let’s be honest. I mean, it doesn’t really taste like tonic, does it? And how does 1783 compare against standard Schweppes tonic? Very Poor. I suppose it’s possible this could partner well with certain gins (I suppose I’ll be seeing if I can find any, given I have five more mini-cans of the stuff to get through, so will let you know) but with a classic London gin, I just don’t think this works. You bastard. With those first two out of the way, things get really rather interesting. There’s something subtly yeasty going on, alongside the usual citrus and quinine, that really fills out the drink and complements the gin without dominating. I know plenty of people don’t have this problem, and, yeah, I’m immeasurably happy for them (dickheads). Been a fan of Schweppes tonic for years, and love this crisp version, Your email address will not be published. Fucking sodium saccharin, that’s what. Perfect My god, I couldn’t agree more re artificial sweeteners – why, oh why? Third place goes to Schweppes 1783 regular. I suppose we’ll find out, otherwise these two paragraphs will have been an extraordinarily cycnical instance of bait-and-switch. Yeah! An eight-pack of Fever Tree Naturally Light Tonic Water is £4.25 at Waitrose, making it 53p per can — cheaper than 1783 at full price. Bah. At some point, I suppose, the Schweppes execs awoke from their slumbers, tumbled comically from their hammocks, and realised something was amiss. All flavours are available in a 4-pack in leading supermarkets and liquor outlets. Goes really well with Roku Gin, Perfect addition to a gin on a hot summers day. I mean, it doesn’t really taste like tonic, does it? Fever Tree’s Regular tonic is jolly nice. It’s far more pronounced in classic Schweppes than in 1783. I was very interested to try the new premium 1783 “skittle” bottle range, launched last year November on a massive 6.6M budget. How can you stand it? Many thanks to the gang at Schweppes for sending me a sample pack to test and play around with! Schweppes 1783: A fresh Tonic to the Market Schweppes launched a new tonic last year and its about time I gave it a review! An eight-pack of Fever Tree Indian Tonic Water is £4.25 at Waitrose, making it 53p per can — cheaper than 1783 at full price. Last updated on October 5, 2020 10:28 am Schweppes 1783 Crisp Tonic Water will help you recreate the perfect G&T at home with its clean, crisp bitterness. Anyhow. And, you know, that’s a wonderful thing. Last update was on: November 26, 2020 11:45 am, Last updated on November 26, 2020 11:45 am. Schweppes 1783 Review I’ve never been a fan of Schweppes Tonic water, and personally feel it doesn’t complement your gin in the same way Fever Tree does. I’m strongly of the view that the better and more interesting your gin, the more compelling the case for accompanying it with Fever Tree Light Tonic. It’s a good, solid, honest drink. 1783 is the year Schweppes started doing its anti-malarial thing, obv, and it’s the premium spin on the familiar old brand. Receive the questionable wisdom and profanic musings of Old Parn direct to your inbox! I’ve never been a fan of Schweppes Tonic water, and personally feel it doesn’t complement your gin in the same way Fever Tree does. There’s an echo of that old Schweppes bite, though as I said it’s less quinine-heavy. And while we’re at it, let’s chuck in a comparison against classic bog-standard Schweppes tonic water for good measure.