Behaviour. In Europe, the breeding population consists of 24,400,000-38,400,000 pairs, which equates to 48,800,000-76,800,000 mature individuals. Long ago Song thrushes were known as ‘throstles’. Their winter habitat is similar to that used for breeding, except that high ground and other exposed localities are avoided; however, some birds will frequent the seashore in winter. Widespread throughout Europe and as far east as Siberia, populations in the north are migratory, heading to Africa, whereas our song thrushes tend to be residents. Edinburgh Song thrush eggs in nest. In Europe, the breeding population consists of 24,400,000-38,400,000 pairs, which equates to 48,800,000-76,800,000 mature individuals. Song thrushes are omnivorous birds and consume a wide range of invertebrates, especially earthworms and snails. Song thrushes are usually not gregarious, although several birds may roost together in winter or be loosely associated in suitable feeding habitats, perhaps with other thrushes such as the blackbird, fieldfare, redwing, and dark-throated thrush. European Stonechat. They fly in loose flocks which cross the sea on a broad front rather than concentrating at short crossings (as occurs in the migration of large soaring birds), and calls frequently to maintain contact. Currently, this species is classified as Least Concern (LC) on the IUCN Red List and its numbers today are increasing. They also eat small berries and soft fruit. Song Thrush on The IUCN Red List site -, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Song_thrush, https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22708822/132076619. Song thrushes feed during the day and find their prey by sight; they use a run-and-stop hunting technique on open ground and will rummage through leaf-litter seeking potential food items. Stay up to date with the Scottish Wildlife Trust by subscribing to our mailing list Subscribe now, Harbourside House Song Thrush (song) song. Birds from Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, and Russia winter around the Mediterranean, North Africa, and the Middle East, but only some of the birds in the milder west of the breeding range leave their breeding areas. Whinchat. Males and females are similar, with plain brown backs and neatly spotted underparts. The male's song, given from trees, rooftops, or other elevated perches, is a loud clear run of musical phrases, repeated two to four times, 'filip filip filip codidio codidio quitquiquit tittit tittit tereret tereret tereret', and interspersed with grating notes and mimicry. Fun Facts for Kids. The name 'throstle' dates back to at least the 14th century and means 'thrush'. Song Thrushes are small birds growing to about 22 – 23 centimetres long and weighing 70 – 90 grams in weight. They typically nest in forests with good undergrowth and nearby more open areas such as heathland. Absent from north-west Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man. Common Nightingale. CLOSE Know what you are looking for? We have been championing the incredible diversity of Scotland’s wildlife for over 50 years; from lichens, wood ants and butterflies, to golden eagles, basking sharks and beavers. Song thrushes are also able to mimic sounds which may include the imitation of man-made items like telephones; thrushes also repeat the calls of captive birds, including exotics such as the white-faced whistling duck. The song thrush is a small songbird, commonly found in parks and gardens, woodland and scrub. After hatching the chicks are fed by both parents for about 2 weeks until they fledge and leave the nest. In gardens, the use of poison bait to control slugs and snails may pose a threat. Visit your nearest wildlife reserve, head out on a guided walk or catch the latest from our live webcams. The Song thrush is a popular songbird that breeds across the West Palearctic. Song thrushes are monogamous (one male to one female) territorial birds, and in areas where they are fully migratory, the males re-establish their breeding territory and start singing as soon as they return. Redwing. 110 Commercial St The song thrush is a small, familiar songbird, commonly found in parks and gardens, woodland and scrub. When the ground becomes too hard to get at them, song thrushes will eat snails instead. Song thrushes will eat all kinds of food, but earthworms make up a large part of their diet. The song thrush has a warm-brown head, wings and back, and a cream breast covered in dark brown spots the shape of upside down hearts. Although Song thrushes are not threatened globally, there have been serious population declines in parts of Europe, possibly due to changes in farming practices. Its distinctive song, which has repeated musical phrases, has frequently been referred to in poetry. Black Redstart. Young thrushes initially flick objects and attempt to play with them until they learn to use anvils as tools to smash snails. Fantastic that he has such an interest and enthusiasm at such young age, but slightly worrying that I've had to post the photo here to confirm whether I was correct or not.!! The song thrush is not usually gregarious, although several birds may roost together in winter or be loosely associated in suitable feeding habitats, perhaps with other thrushes such as the blackbird, fieldfare, redwing and dark-throated thrush. Like song thrushes, they spend a lot of the spring and summer on the ground looking for invertebrates, and with their typical thrush hops, upright stance and other movements, this is when they’re probably hardest to tell apart, particularly from behind. Up to at least the 19th century the Song thrush was kept as a cage bird because of its melodious voice. Currently, this species is classified as Least Concern (LC) on the IUCN Red List and its numbers today are increasing. Mistle thrushes start nesting even earlier than song thrushes, sometimes in February! In the milder areas where some birds stay year-round, the resident males remain in their breeding territory, singing intermittently, but the females may establish a separate individual wintering range until pair formation begins in the early spring. Song thrushes are famous for their sweet songs and an individual male may have a repertoire of more than 100 phrases, many copied from its parents and neighboring birds. Northern Wheatear. Land snails are an especially important food item for Song thrushes when drought or hard weather makes it hard to find other food. Bluethroat. Song Thrushes are smaller than Blackbirds (Turdus merula) and smaller and browner than a mistle thrush with smaller spotting. From major species and landscape projects to managing wildlife reserves, education work and campaigning for nature, we protect Scotland’s wildlife for the future. Ring Ouzel. Classified in the UK as a Red List species under the Birds of Conservation Concern review and as a Priority Species in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan. While the song thrush was once one of our most common birds, it is now unfortunately a red-listed species of conservation concern. Whether you choose to volunteer, donate, raise funds or leave a legacy to the Trust, your help will make a real difference to our work protecting Scotland’s wildlife. During migration, Song thrushes travel mainly at night with a strong and direct flight action. Song thrushes breed from March until April, often producing three broods of up to five blue, spotty eggs. These birds have a short, sharp 'tsip' call, replaced on migration by a thin high 'seep' and their alarm call is a 'chook-chook'. Song thrush. EH6 6NF. Living up to its common name, it has a beautiful, loud song with repeating phrases. It has brown upperparts and black-spotted cream or buff underparts and has three recognized subspecies.