My personal favourite is a spicy version (辣豆瓣酱 – là dòu bàn jiàng where  là means “hot”) shown in the picture below on the left called Hot Broadbean Paste which can be found in Wing Yip chinese supermarket. This iconic dish can be found in any self respecting restaurant claiming to make “chuan cai” along with many restaurants all over China as well as China town. Every commercially available version of this paste I can find contains wheat in the form of flour. 3 tablespoon groundnut oil or vegetable oil JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. 1 small non stick pan It is made from a unique blend of fermented broad bean paste (water, broad beans, wheat flour, water, salt), salted chili peppers , modified corn starch, fermented soybean paste (salt, water, wheat flour, soybean), chili pepper powder, soybean oil, dehydrated garlic and two flavor enhancers. Lee Kum Kee Chili Bean Sauce (Toban Djan) (13 oz.) Lee Kum Kee Toban Djian: This is a popular brand in North America and is often used in Hunan Chicken. I’ve used Sriracha hot sauce as an alternative but it’s really no comparison to the real thing. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Every commercially available version of this paste I can find contains wheat in the form of flour. It’s easy to recognize from the red color in the bottle. In essence this is a quick dish with few ingredients but never the less producing maximum flavour! Recipes that use Doubanjiang Then mix the cornflour with 5 tablespoons of water. 200 ml vegetable stock (chicken stock if vegetarianism is not your thing), 1 small/medium wok In a pinch, you can also mix up a 50/50 mix of red miso and chili flakes (ideally Chinese chili flakes). In general, LKK products are great for entry-level cooking because they're friendly, balanced, and accessible. The traditional method is also list for those gunning for authenticity. Based in Hong Kong with U.S. offices in America, their products cover mostly southern China. This is due to a very critical ingredient in Sichuan cuisine called Broadband Paste, Doubanjiang, Toban Djan or even chilli bean paste/sauce (豆瓣酱 – dòu bàn jiàng). Firstly to start with a warning, the authentic version of this recipe is NOT GLUTEN FREE… YET! 4 spring onions, chopped 1 medium red chilli (optional for extra heat and not necessary when using Sriracha), finely chopped * Both are of secondary significance after soy sauce. Add the celery and fry for 3 minutes, stir to make sure it doesn’t stick. I was making this recipe but did not have the sambal oelek that the recipe called for. It is made from a unique blend of fermented broad bean paste (water, broad beans, wheat flour, water, salt), salted chili peppers , modified corn starch, fermented soybean paste (salt, water, wheat flour, soybean), chili pepper powder, soybean oil, dehydrated garlic and two flavor enhancers. Sambal oelek vs toban djan? You may also see it referred to as, “spicy bean paste,” “spicy broad bean paste,” or “broad bean chili sauce.” 300 g silken tofu (other soft to medium tofu is also fine, silken tofu fall apart more easily but I prefer the texture when eating) Lee Kum Kee also sells a serviceable easier to find Cantonese style doubanjiang that they call Toban Djan or chilli bean sauce. The secret weapon in twice-cooked pork, mapo doufu, mala hot pot and scores of other Sichuan dishes, douban is little known outside China—and the authentic version is little known outside Sichuan. Here are great ideas on how to cook with doubanjiang and why you should always have some on hand at home. This is a funny spelling of doubanjiang that's used by Lee Kum Kee, a well-distributed producer of Asian condiments. Once I find a recipe which can produce a gluten free version of this paste, then this delicious dish can officially join this blog.